Contrast the work of Renoir and Laurtrec, art & design homework help

choose two of the five questions below and answer them in essay formatEach of your responses should be a minimum of 300 words in length, include a minimum of three key terms from below and must use references.  References used must be cited.

  1. Contrast
    the work of Renoir and Laurtrec. How do the subjects’ styles of the
    artists reflect nineteenth century French society and the innovations of
    nineteenth century art? Use examples to support your essay.
  2. Describe the impact the Armory Show (1913) had on the American art scene. Use examples to support your essay.
  3. Describe
    Pablo Picasso’s Demoiselles d’Avignon. How did this work re-shape the
    art of the early twentieth century? Include in your discussion the
    influences coming from Primitive art. Use examples to support your
    essay.
  4. Describe the development of sculpture at the end of the
    nineteenth century. Use examples to support your essay. To what extent
    did sculpture remain conventional? What painting movements did it take
    into account?
  5. Explain the development of Cubism and the artistic movements that it spawned. Use examples to support your essay

terms:

  • Additive light
    • Natural light, or sunlight, the sum of all the wavelengths of the visible spectrum. See also subtractive light.
  • Additive sculpture
    • A kind of sculpture technique in which materials (for example, clay) are built up or “added” to create form.
  • Attribute (n.)
    • The
      distinctive identifying aspect of a person, for example, an object
      held, an associated animal, or a mark on the body. (v.) To make an
      attribution.
  • Carving
    • A
      technique of sculpture in which the artist cuts away material (for
      example, from a stone block) in order to create a statue or a relief.
  • Casting
    • A technique of sculpture in which the artist places a fluid substance, such as bronze or plaster in a mold.
  • Chronology
    • In art history, the dating of art objects and buildings.
  • Collage
    • A
      composition made by combining on a flat surface various materials, such
      as newspaper, wallpaper, printed text and illustrations, photographs,
      and cloth.
  • Color
    • The
      value or tonality of a color is the degree of its lightness or darkness.
      The intensity or saturation of a color is its purity, its brightness or
      dullness. See also primary, econdary, and complementary colors.
  • Composition
    • The
      way in which an artist organizes forms in an artwork, either by placing
      shapes on a flat surface or arranging forms in space.
  • Evidence
    • In
      art history, the examination of written sources in order to determine
      the date of an artwork, the circumstances of its creation, or the
      identity of the artist(s) who made it.
  • Foreshortening
    • The
      use of perspective to represent in art the apparent visual contraction
      of an object that extends back in space at an angle to the perpendicular
      plane of sight.
  • Form
    • In
      art, an object’s shape and structure, either in two dimensions (for
      example, a figure painted on a surface) or in three dimensions (such as a
      statue).
  • Formal analysis
    • The visual anaylsis of artistic form.
  • Genre
    • A style or category of art; also, a kind of painting that realistically depicts scenes from everyday life.
  • Hierarchy of scale
    • An artistic convention in which greater size indicates greater importance.
  • Iconography
    • Greek,
      the “writing of images.” The term refers both to the content, or
      subject, of an artwork and to the study of content in art. It also
      includes the study of the symbolic, often religious, meaning of objects,
      persons, or events depicted in works of art.
  • Illusionism (adj. illusionistic)
    • The
      representation of the three-dimensional world on a two-dimensional
      surface in a manner that creates the illusion that the person, object,
      or place represented is three-dimensional. See also perspective.
  • Intensity
    • The
      value or tonality of a color is the degree of its lightness or
      darkness. The intensity or saturation of a color is its purity, its
      brightness or dullness. See also primary, secondary, and complementary
      colors.
  • Landscape
    • A picture showing natural scenery, without narrative content.
  • Line
    • The extension of a point along a path, made concrete in art by drawing on or chiseling into a plane.
  • Medium (pl. media)
    • The
      material (for example, marble, bronze, clay, fresco) in which an artist
      works; also, in painting, the vehicle (usually liquid) that carries the
      pigment.
  • Mural
    • A wall painting.
  • Period style
    • A
      distinctive artistic manner. Period style is the characteristic style
      of a specific time. Regional style is the style of a particular
      geographical area. Personal style is an individual artist’s unique
      manner.
  • Personal style
    • A
      distinctive artistic manner. Period style is the characteristic style
      of a specific time. Regional style is the style of a particular
      geographical area. Personal style is an individual artist’s unique
      manner.
  • Perspective
    • A
      method of presenting an illusion of the three-dimensional world on a
      two-dimensional surface. In linear perspective, the most common type,
      all parallel lines or surface edges converge on one, two, or three
      vanishing points located with reference to the eye level of the viewer
      (the horizon line of the picture), and associated objects are rendered
      smaller the farther from the viewer they are intended to seem.
      Atmospheric, or aerial, perspective creates the illusion of distance by
      the greater diminution of color intensity, the shift in color toward an
      almost neutral blue, and the blurring of contours as the intended
      distance between eye and object increases.
  • Physical evidence
    • In art history, the examination of the materials used to produce an artwork in order to determine its date.
  • Proportion
    • The relationship in size of the parts of persons, buildings, or objects, often based on a module.
  • Regional style
    • A
      distinctive artistic manner. Period style is the characteristic style
      of a specific time. Regional style is the style of a particular
      geographical area. Personal style is an individual artist’s unique
      manner.
  • School
    • A chronological and stylistic classification of works of art with a stipulation of place.
  • Space
    • In
      art history, both the actual area which an object occupies or a
      building encloses, and the illusionistic representation of space in
      painting and sculpture.
  • Spectrum
    • The range or band of visible colors in natural light.
  • Statue
    • A three-dimensional sculpture.
  • Still life
    • A picture depicting an arrangement of objects.
  • Style
    • A
      distinctive artistic manner. Period style is the characteristic style
      of a specific time. Regional style is the style of a particular
      geographical area. Personal style is an individual artist’s unique
      manner.
  • Stylistic evidence
    • In art history, the examination of the style of an artwork in order to determine its date or the identity of the artist.
  • Symbol
    • An image that stands for another image or encapsulates an idea.
  • Technique
    • The
      processes that artists employ to create form, as well as the
      distinctive, personal ways in which they handle their materials and
      tools.
  • Texture
    • The quality of a surface, such as rough or shiny.
  • Tonality
    • The
      value or tonality of a color is the degree of its lightness or
      darkness. The intensity or saturation of a color is its purity, its
      brightness or dullness. See also primary, secondary, and complementary
      colors.
  • Tone
    • The lightness or darkness of a color.
  • Value
    • The
      value or tonality of a color is the degree of its lightness or
      darkness. The intensity or saturation of a color is its purity, its
      brightness or dullness. See also primary, secondary, and complementary
      colors.
  • Volume
    • The space that mass organizes, divides, or encloses.
  • Weld
    • To join metal parts by heating, as in assembling the separate parts of a statue made by casting.

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